Neon signs in Edmonton, Alberta, with its warm reds, hot pinks and bright yellow blinking lights, aren’t just for advertising a business. These are valuable cultural artefacts that carry the city’s sensory heritage, and as such, deserve to be preserved in the museum.

The city has, in fact, set up the very first Neon Sign Museum in Canada. On display outside the Telus building’s walls is a growing collection of iconic neon signs from establishments that operated in different eras since the 1920s.

Following their closure, these signs were restored and showcased at 104 Street and 104 Avenue. The Neon Sign Museum, which launched in February 2014, is open 24/7 but the displays are best seen at night.

Edmonton Neon Signs Back in the Day

Neon signs that littered Edmonton’s buildings were regarded as “visual clutter” back in the day. Every business had a neon sign and each one tried to be different, wilder and brighter.

In the 1970s, the government of Edmonton had to restrict its use. For one thing, business signs were required to use energy-efficient LED lights, which dimmed the brightness a little bit.

Today, however, the city has embraced neon signs as its legacy with the Neon Sign Museum. Businesses, old and new, continue to illuminate the streets with colorful neon signs.

Best Neon Signs in Edmonton

Here are the best neon signs in the city of Edmonton in Alberta.

  1. Canada Furniture Neon Sign

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https://www.signmedia.ca/illumination-edmontons-neon-sign-museum/

The Canada Furniture neon sign gave birth to the Neon Sign Museum in Edmonton. David Holdsworth, the city’s senior planner, convinced the shop owners to hand over the neon sign to him, when the store decided to close in 1998, for a project he was planning to mount. The neon sign was supposed to be heading to the dumpster.

The business opened in 1933 and was a familiar establishment. It was owned and operated by Samuel Dolinko.

 

  1. Georgia Baths

giorgia-baths

https://www.edmonton.ca/city_government/edmonton_archives/georgia-baths-sign.aspx

Georgia Baths offered Turkish bath services to Edmonton locals. It had several dedicated hot rooms for male and female patrons. It also had sleeping rooms and a barbershop with a shoeshine stand.

Steam baths used to be popular in Edmonton because there were many European immigrants in the city. Georgia Baths wasn’t the first top operate though, but it was the city’s oldest public steam bath. In its decades of operation, the Georgia Baths would open and close several times, but it locked its doors for good in 2005.

  1. Soda Jerks Neon Sign

custom-neon-signs-canada

https://www.pinterest.ph/pin/710302172454602113/

Soda Jerks was a family diner located in St. Albert. Its neon sign wasn’t hard to spot, with the caricature of an appealing waitress in sexy uniform and skates. The sign stood in the parking lot that was always filled with cars during the evenings of Fridays and Saturdays. In 2015, however, the diner closed down.

 

  1. Seven Seas Neon Sign

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https://www.royalalbertamuseum.ca/exhibits/online/chopSuey/the-seven-seas.html

The Seven Seas was western Canada’s largest restaurant, as it had three dining areas that could accommodate 750 people any day. Established in 1948, it was the site for weddings and group banquets. It was also the favorite hangout of the Edmonton Eskimos, the Canadian football team.

Adorned with a decorative neon signs, Seven Seas became a landmark in Edmonton for several decades. This place served mainly Canadian and Chinese dishes but the business closed in 1980.

 The spa is Canada’s largest health and wellness membership-based company and operates in over 75 locations. Every location, however, has this familiar bright green signboard with the silhouette of a woman.

 

  1. Pantages Theatre Neon Sign

custom-neon-signs-edmonton

https://www.pinterest.ph/pin/710302172454602701

Entrepreneur Alexander Pantages built a chain of vaudeville theatres around the world and the Pantages Theatre neon sign in Edmonton lit up in 1913.

Set at a two-story Edwardian brick building, the theatre showed silent movies and live shows. Unfortunately, it was renamed to the Metropolitan Movie Theatre, and thus the original sign has to be taken down.

The Pantages Theatre neon sign now rests at the famous outdoor museum.

 

Attract More Business with Customized Neon Signs

Your business in Edmonton, Alberta could become part of the city’s legacy one day. Your one-time investment can go a long way to attract more clients and customers and serve your store for 10 years or more.

Neon signs are easy to maintain and you’ll have plenty of room to accommodate any design you want. Don’t hesitate to tap the help of professional sign makers who can come up with a creative customized neon signboard for your business.

Request a custom neon sign quote

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